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Intern Cover Letter Engineering Position

Sample cover letter for a mechanical engineer

If you’re looking for a job as a mechanical engineer, this sample cover letter will help you draft an introduction to prospective employers that will get results.

Stand out from the competition with a well-crafted cover letter.

If you’re looking to stand out, an impressive cover letter will help you manufacture an introduction to prospective employers. View our sample cover letter for a mechanical engineer below.

Additionally, you can learn about engineering careers and search for mechanical engineer jobs on Monster.

Impress employers with a high-impact resume and cover letter from the experts at Monster's Resume Writing Service.
 

 

 

ROBYN A. MATTHEWS
15 Elm Lane
Sometown, IN 55555
Home: (555) 555-5555
rmatthews@somedomain.com

 

January 9, 2018

Mr. Andrew Smith
Director of Operations
123 Company
15 Lafayette Way
Sometown, IN 55555

Re: Mechanical Engineer Position (Ref. Code: 12345), advertised on Monster.com

Dear Mr. Smith:

Your job description for a mechanical engineer perfectly matches my qualifications, and I am very interested in the opportunity.

I have enjoyed a progressively responsible engineering career with ABC Manufacturing Co., and participated in the engineering of three major car model changes. I am experienced in all phases of new vehicle model development and implementation, from conception to production stages. Most recently, I have:
 

  • Contributed to major model changes for the 2008 Carname, 2007 Carname and 2006 Carname;
  • Developed process plans and layouts for seven additional car models;
  • Reduced ergonomic impact on production team members by designing new assist lift systems;
  • Helped create estimation and calculation tool for project budgets, greatly improving negotiating power with installation contractors; and
  • Built rapport with overseas colleagues, often traveling to Japan for production consultations.

In addition, I have served as lead engineer in establishing standards that have reduced costs, enhanced efficiency, improved production methods and simplified equipment and part needs.

Mr. Smith, I have received repeated commendations from ABC Manufacturing Co. for my work quality, revenue contributions, and commitment to achieving company goals, and I know I would be a valuable asset to your North American Division. Please feel free to call me at 555-555-5555 or send an email to rmatthews@somedomain.com to arrange a meeting. I look forward to speaking with you!

Sincerely,



Robyn A. Matthews
Enclosure: Resume

See all sample cover letters on Monster. 

 

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A cover letter is an important tool to use when applying for a job because it:

  • Introduces you to the prospective employer
  • Highlights your enthusiasm for the position
  • Describes your specific skills and qualifications for the job or internship, and clearly explains why you are a good fit
  • Confirms your availability to start a new position

You should always include a cover letter when applying for a job unless you are specifically told not to by the employer. We recommend that you write a cover letter (aka letter of intent) after you have drafted and tailored your resume or curriculum vitae (CV) for a particular job description. For academic faculty and teaching positions, see cover letter instructions in Masters, Ph.D.'s and Postdocs section. When applying online and limited to uploading one document, you can create a single PDF document that includes both your resume and cover letter.

What to Include in a Cover Letter

Use the cover letter template and planner to get started. When drafting your cover letter, keep the following DO’s and DON’Ts in mind:

Do's

  • Limit the cover letter to one page if possible, unless applying to academic faculty, teaching or research positions.
  • Use the same font and formatting in the cover letter as you use in your resume.
  • You might also want to use the same header in both a cover letter and resume. See header formatting examples.
  • If providing a printed copy, use the same type of paper for both your cover letter and resume. Resume paper can be purchased at the UC Davis Bookstore or at an office supply store.
  • Many tech companies prefer the cover letter not be attached, but uploaded as text in an email with the resume attached.
  • Use formal, professional language in a cover letter. This is true when sending your cover letter as text in an email (above point).
  • Personalize each cover letter to the specific position you are applying to.
  • Address your cover letter to a specific person or the hiring manager whenever possible. If you don’t know their name, use one of the following examples:
    • "Dear Hiring Manager,"
    • "Dear [insert department here] Hiring Team,"
    • "Dear Recruiter, "
    • “Dear Search Committee Chair and Committee Members:” (used for academic teaching positions)
    • "To Whom It May Concern: " Note, this last one uses a “:” not a “,”
  • Check for typos, proper grammar and accuracy.
  • Use spellcheck, but do not rely on it to catch all errors.
  • Have multiple people review your application materials.
  • Make an appointment with an ICC adviser to review your application materials before you apply.

Don'ts

  • Unless told explicitly not to, you should always include a cover letter in your application.
  • Don’t use text abbreviations or emoticons if you are using email.
  • Don’t be too wordy or write just to fill the entire page.
  • Don’t submit a generic “one size fits all” cover letter; tailor your cover letter to fit each position. Thus, none of your cover letters will be exactly the same, though a lot of content will be similar in each.
  • Don’t repeat or summarize your resume in your cover letter. Instead, focus the cover letter on your enthusiasm for the job, excitement about working with that organization, to highlight unique skills that make you qualified for the position and a good fit for the employer.
  • Don’t overuse adjectives or superlatives, especially subjective ones (e.g. “You are the best company in the world” or “I am the most hardworking student intern you will ever meet.”).
  • Quantify when possible. "I've helped organize three club events, including two successful initiatives attended by 25 people" is a better descriptor then "I've helped organize several club events, including a couple successful initiatives attended by many people."
  • Don’t exaggerate your skills or experience.
  • Don’t use UC Davis letterhead, logo, or UC seal in your cover letter. [NOTE: For graduate students and postdocs, some departments allow use of department letterhead for tenure-track faculty applications. Check with your department before using.]